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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
of mathematics, at least three years of science and at least three years of social science, comparedded to those who students who did not complete a core curriculum, those students completing a core curriculum scored 144 points higher on the s.a.t. >> suarez: what do we know about the predictive value of the test itself? you have a threshold for college readiness. if you go into an institution of higher learning without reaching thathreshold, a u automatically going to fail, not complete? what do we know? >> absolutely not. that threshold is a guide. it allows us to look at groups of students. what we know is that the group of students who meet the threshold have a 65% likelihood of achieving a b-minus g.p.a. or higher during their freshman year. obviously there are other factors that admission officers take into consideration. but it does help guide us in thinking about where we are and the need to have more students better prepared for college. currently of 100 ninth graders, 44 will go on to college. yet only 21 will graduate within a six-year period. this is highly problematic. >> suarez: ro
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
will be developed by a school teacher? >> yes. there's an entire line of science toys, encouraging girls to get involved in science. there's journals, online, interactivity way to get kids hooked on science. >> reporter: this comes from the d.c. area. word around. >> this is a travel game you can take with you. for older kids and adults. moves quick. it's a lot of fun. >> reporter: now let's talk about younger kids. >> this is an active game. based on disney fairies. you put them around the house. girls will pull one of these out of the bag. when you get to fairy, you run around the house and try to grab as many as you can. they're up and active. this is green toys, made of 100% recycled plastic. it's waterproof so kids can take it in the bath. not only can you control the car, you can play music now. i have all my songs downloaded on itunes. then i can open up the doors of the car and the car becomes a speaker. >> reporter: blue tooth from the device to the vehicle? >> yeah. you can drive it, may your music and it's kind of fun. >> reporter: really by moving the ipad around will steer the car.
i think the worse case scenario is to be some cheesy science project dirty bomb or something with low you but you float into the seattle harbor or whatever on a container ship, or something like tel aviv harbor or whatever. so there's no like destroy the world scenario that's likely, in my opinion, with any of these terrorist regimes. and i think it's important for people who don't understand nuclear weapons to know that, to realize that. so the thing that occurred to me was you said, you were saying that if we had such a thing happen, like a hiroshima type weapon go off in one of the harbors or something like that, we wouldn't know at the time it's too late to know how to respond, where do you respond. so i guess my question would be, that's still the case now, how do we know where to respond? i guess other than iran and korea, how do we know even how to begin to respond now while we think these guys are developing their science project weapon? >> let me take the last part first. we have nuclear forensics for certain countries. we know the signatures of the weapons. russia,
at 8:30 eastern, the political science professor at norfolk state will focus on the history of the african american vote in virginia. we will also be joined by the editor in chief of the washington monthly to discuss a recent article in the magazine examining the consumer financial protection bureau. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: this wednesday morning we would love to hear your take on foreign policy. specifically on what the governor -- former governor massachusetts, mitt romney, and president barack obama had said yesterday. specifically yesterday said -- specifically we want your general level confidence in each candidate on the area of foreign policy. here are the numbers to call. for democrats, 202-737-0001. for republicans, 202-737-0002. for independents, 202-628-0205. if you would like to take part in the program, there are different ways to do that. twitter.com/c-spanwj,an.o facebook.com or e-mail at journal@c-span.org. "the baltimore sun" encapsulate the speeches yesterday. they pointed out that president barack obama made an impassioned defense of the ex
with the right skills here at home. nevada, i wanted, recruit thousands of new math and science teachers, improve early education, create 2 million more slots in community colleges so that workers can get trained for the new jobs out there now. help us work with colleges and universities to keep tuition down. that is a goal we can meet together. you cannot choose that future for america -- can choose that future for america, but what we need to do? >> vote. >> i have already worked with republicans and democrats to cut spending by $1 trillion. i'm willing to do a little bit more. i want to reform our tax code so that idea is simple and fair. but i also want to ask the wealthiest households in america to pay slightly higher taxes. that is the same rate we had when bill clinton was president and we created 23 million new jobs, the biggest surplus in history, and a whole lot of millionaires to boot. [applause] so that is my plan. in fairness, my opponent has got a plan, too. there's only one problem. some of you heard bill clinton say that there is no or arithmetic in it. [laughter] they think that
intelligence estimate and an independent assessment by the national academy of sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: thanks for staying with us. i'm bill o'reilly. three hot topics, beginning with another unbelievable aclu campaign. this one in michigan. they're asking a federal judge to prohibit a checkoff box on voting registration applications that asserts the person voting is a citizen of the united states. they don't want that. here now, attorneys of fox news analyst kimberly gill guilfoyle and his wheel. who is it going to hurt and suppress? >> suppress everybody in michigan because everyone will be confused. >> bill: confused. >> are you a u.s. citizen? >> bill: that's going to confuse nerve. >> that's what the aclu is saying. i hate to agree with you. i hate it. >> bill: this is just madness and stupidity. >> yes. >> bill: more aclu taking up the time of the courts. >> they're saying the process -- >> due process. >> confuse the issue, which you have to say you're an american citizen. >> bill: you know why they're doing this, don't you? >> of course, because they want to
with countries around the world to deepen ties of trade and investment, and science and technology, energy and development -- all efforts that can spark economic growth for all our people and stabilize democratic change. but such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school or ngo will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. for partnerships to be effective our citizens must be secure and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger -- one based on dividing the world between "us" and "them" -- not only sets back international cooperation, it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to these forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed in benghazi, a turkish police officer was murdered in istanbul only days before his wedding. more than 10 yemenis were killed in a car bomb in sana'a. several afghan children were mourned by their parents just days after they were ki
holding businesses responsible. >> in the light jacket. >> hi, i co-chaired the defense science energy security task force with jim schlesinger and i currently just been named the technical cochairman of the chief of naval operations vulnerability on energy security and i would like to talk about, first of i like to take the opportunity say that, the states and ferc on electricity and energy regulation, the states regulate almost exclusively for rate, rates, not for reliability at all. and ferc regulations are, they can take effect after a process that takes four to six years. in light of the rate of threat which is something else i wanted to talk about, we have no effective regulatory system. so i'm particularly concerned about sif and particularly concerned about cyber and i, i would like to call into question the perishability of cyber solutions. the lot of the discussion today, which i completely agree with all of it, focused on the cyber solutions to the cyber problems but i would like to point out that because of the rate of the threat, particularly with the bad actors, we might
me recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers. help me give 2 million workers the chance to learn the skills they need at community colleges that will lead directly to a new job. help us work with colleges and universities to cut the cost of tuition. [applause] help us choose that future for americans. number 4, let's reduce the deficit in a way that does not stick it to middle class families. i have already worked republicans to cut one trillion dollars in spending and i'm willing to do more. i have a plan for a trillion deficit-reduction. we cannot cut our way to prosperity. we have to cut our tax code and ask the wealthiest households to pay higher taxes. to go back to the same rate when bill clinton was president. when we created 23 million new jobs and the biggest surplus and history, and a lot of millionaires to boot. in fairness, my opponent has a plan when it comes to taxes. but as president clinton said, it does not have an arithmetic. -- any arithmetic. they are selling the idea you could spend trillions of dollars on tax breaks for the wealthy. no matter how many times
before, is a science and technology, not for profit policy think tank, if you will for the washington, d.c., area that focuses on how science and technology affects our national security. for quite some time, we have been involved in the study of issues in and around what people call acementic threats. and most importantly terrorism. this past year, professor al sander an i realize released our second volume on al qaeda about the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11. i would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available here and on the web and amazon. all the good things. i want to highlight it today. it's one of the gifts we are going to give to the members for takes the time out of their busy schedule to join us today. i can patrol you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second work that the institute has been evolved in is the wefort the corporation to look at the cyber issue in particular cyber doctorate. that volume ed kitted by tim and i is in publication as we speak. so you a short flier of that summarizes what is in the volume. it will be out shortly
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
was astonished to find that akin's sits on the science committee and he fails to understand 8th grade biology. it illustrates t point that we have 535 people to regulate everything but produce thing. we really need to step back and understand that his views and the views of an individual shouldn't be regulated by the government. he speaks for smaller government, yet he wants to push govnment morality on other individuals because they choose a different way of life. as your senator, i think the issues of abortion are really a wedge issue to take away and distract from the important issues like balancing the budgets and ending the wars and destroying your personal freedom. step back and take a look at the important issues. >> congressman akin, there were several characterizations of your position there. would oatlikoffer a chance of rebuttal? >> there were a few words ere. let's start with a couple really basic things. if you don't believe the federal government should do everything, it doesn't mean you don't believe in it. the question do you want the federal governmt to take over everything t
on the road. governor from throat to google northern campus. he said today science fiction is tomorrow's reality. an update on a story brought to us we. sales design review board has approved amazon rain tower design for its new headquarter. huge panels of metal. it has been contested by residents. it was three-two. the biggest development model ever in downtown seattle. dennis: airlines are socking it to passengers with baggage fees. cheryl: let's take a look at today's winners and losers on the nasdaq. research in motion it is always a winner or a loser. we will be right back. ♪ ♪ cheryl: about one thousand people protested outside the united nations today as president mahmoud ahmadinejad made his last speech as president of iran. purport cheryl, this was a less fiery speech that many people may have expected from president mahmoud ahmadinejad of iran. nonetheless, he took aim at his usual target, israel and the united states. he once again accused the israelis of being "a fake ever met" as he put it. he blamed united states for most of the world's problems. he said "it was time
, who will win? who are you picking? the way we look at it is not positivistic social science. it is anthropological. it is geographical. it is historical. this person hated that person's visions of the military. the senior general in the pakistani military told me, you americans think of your army and how sergeant gonzales from los angeles and the corporal from chicago and the major from new jersey all come into the military. you are all put into the military and it is a uniform group and you mix the pieces. we see this part of the world, especially afghanistan, as needing a regimental area. in your attempt to define the end game with institutions you are comfortable with, you are missing the point. they see the america effort, a transformational vision of afghanistan, that transformation effort -- little girls go to school, making it into something, spending a huge amount of money. i would argue the pakistanis have a static notion. they have been this way for 1000they beat the brits and the russians. they will beat you. i am agreeing with you in coming to some sort of closur
, science, and technology for a limited group. policies of the world's main centers of power are based on the principle of domination and the conquering of others. these centers only seeks supremacy and are not in favor of peace and definitely not at the service of their nations. are we to believe that those who have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on election campaigns have the interest of the people of the world at their hearts? despite what political parties claim the capitalist countries the money that goes into election campaigns is usually nothing but an investment. in such countries, people have to move for parties that only represent a small number of people. the view of the matters have the least impact and influence on the big decisions, especially those made of the domestic and foreign policies. in the united states and in europe, their voices are heard. they constitute 99% of the society. the human add ethical value are sacrificed in order to win growth and the willingness to listen to the demands of the people has become only to the time of election. the current worl
. aims to monopolize power, wealth, science and technology for a limited group. policies of the world are the main centers of power are based on the principle of domination and the conquering of others. these symptoms only seeks supremacy and are not in favor of peace indefinitely not of their nation. they are led to believe that those who spend hundreds of millions of dollars on election campaigns have the interest of the people of the world at their hearts despite what the political claim in a capitalist countries. the money that goes into the political campaign is nothing usually but -- parties that only represent a small number of people. the real views of the masses have the least impact and influence on the big decisions especially those made about the domestic and foreign policies. in the united states and in europe. their voices are not heard, even if they constitute 99% of the society's. human and ethical values are sacrificed in order to -- and their willingness to listen to the demands of the people has become only a two at a time in election. the current world order is --
the permeability of the field. my science, i took geology, soak it helped me. -- so it helped me. i can act as the translator with the policy makers. i enjoyed that part. because the permeability is damaged, it is harder to extract oil from the field, because it is like you are drinking a can of soda. i use this analogy. that more you drink, the less liquid you have in the can, said the less suction unique. your damaging the field. the iraqis are doing that from 2003 to 2007. it is unclear of the damage that has been done to this field. now that you have kurds producing from the northern zone, that is unclear how that interacts, because at some level the three reservoirs can act. what does that mean for care kirk? i do not know. there are other fields that her produce, but what you are getting is at most 500,000 barrels a day, of which 300,000 can go to the pipeline. this does not make turks happy. iraq has problems. they'd be to work on reconnecting these pipelines or trying to get a contractor to kirkuk. kerr ki the political risk is extremely high. i am so focused on the north, and since
to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday
is in sarasota high school. her science class was supposed to be for 24 students. she's the 36th student in that classroom. they sent me a picture of her in the classroom. they can't squeeze another desk in for her, so she has to stand during class. i want the federal government, consistent with local control and new accountability, to make improvement of our schools the number one priority so caley will have a desk and can sit down in a classroom where she can learn. >> all right. so having heard the two of you, the voters have just heard the two of you, what is the difference? what is the choice between the two of you on education? >> the first is, the difference is there is no new accountability measures in vice president gore's plan. he says he's for voluntary testing. you can't have voluntary testing. you must have mandatory testing. you must say that if you receive money you must show us whether or not children are learning to read and write and add and subtract. that's the difference. you may claim you've got mandatory testing but you don't, mr. vice president. that's a huge diffe
show relative to cutting-edge health and science. because so often it's at odds with what conventional thinking is. so what i offer is the options to alternative health. bio -- hormones for women and men. new ways to treat your heart rather than taking a statin. i'm bringing scientists and doctors onto my show, allowing them a platform, wrapped in glamour. i have a million dollar set and a million dollar wardrobe and great shoes. >> we believe that. >> something for everybody. >> eye candy, right? we were talking earlier, i was telling alina, i used to watch you all the time when i was growing up. >> i'm so happy about that. >> everybody. you're known as an actress. she was just so dumb. but then i heard her talk. and it was a stereotype. you played a really great role. but really, you kind of were part of the feminist movement. >> well that's good. that's good. that's why i wanted to renegotiate. no, no, no, i'm acting. i was telling you earlier that when i renegotiated after the five-year mark, the network people thought that they were negotiating with chrissy snow. and so, they made
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. for the first time since it went public google he is amarket value now eclipses that of microsoft. when you take a look at the ten years for the two stocks you will see much of it made up by the fact that, yeah, google has gone up and microsoft has not. or not much beyond that 27.9% that we're talking about. google's move recently of course has been the reason the why it is around 248, 249 and a little weak today on down grade but interesting to note the fortunes of both of thoses in terms of google's appreciation and what it is in a larger market value company. >>s interesting to think when facebook was going public people would think facebook google, google being the old guard of tech and facebook being the new guard and wonder field goal that would also happen wz very seen with google and microsoft and so far we have not. >> seems that google won the mobile war. >> in the meantime might want to take a look at gold today, the highest level since november, not just
dwet into it, how do you judge the brand science. >> you look at the proportion of the earnings to the brand. put a number on how important is this brand to the economic power of the company. >> i'm saying now revealing it, why is coke number one and not apple? >> coca-cola, i mean, one thing about brands is that they are not just a measure of what's going on now. they are a view into the future as well. the thing about coca-cola that you can't deny, 100-year-plus history of consistently delivering great product and relevant brand to people. apple -- as far as apple is concerned, we know they're doing great right now, but there's concerns about what might happen in the near future with the loss of steve jobs. >> i understand why you're so focused on brands, because brands is what you do. you advertise companies. they pay you money to make their brand bigger. actually in a world in which we're connecting over the internet where i care if my coffee maker is purchasable on amazon rather than the brand of that coffee maker is what you do for a living becomes less relevant? >> i'd sa
to push the boundaries of science and technology so are innovators and entrepreneurs can start these companies. to think about that as a form of success, in education, roughly 30% of high-school students drop out. we used to leave the world in high school graduates. we no longer. on infrastructure, we are $2 trillion in the deficit in terms of the infrastructure. on immigration, we have a policy where we give you a great education and then get the hell out. 1b're still fighting simple h visa issues. i do not think we have in any way remedied this. on government-funded research, it looks like any cagy headed to -- ekg heading to a heart attack. on each one of those indices that has made as great, i see is not going in the direction that we should be. for me, that is the alarm bell and the peptalk have been trying to put forth. >> i will ask the same question to you. are we a strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see a measurable in meaningful decline? >> to me, it's obvious we're not as strong as we have ever been for the reasons that tom has just enumerated but also
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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